WWF’s Living Planet Report

WWF’s Living Planet Report
WWF’s Living Planet Report 2016 released and a few wildlife updates you should know
WWF Update: Wildlife
Dear Paula,

According to the Living Planet Report released today, vertebrate populations declined by 58% between 1970 and 2012. The report dives deep into a variety of research to document the health of the planet and what it means for humans and wildlife.

Below you’ll find more information on the report, as well as some of the latest updates and happenings related to wildlife over the last couple of weeks:

CITES
WWF Update: Wildlife
The 17th Conference of the Parties to CITES took place in Johannesburg from Sept. 24 – Oct. 5, 2016. Governments united behind a number of decisions to provide greater protection to a host of threatened species and bolster efforts to tackle soaring levels of poaching and wildlife trafficking. All legal trade of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked mammal, will soon end thanks to a CITES agreement to further protect the critically endangered species from extinction.
END Wildlife Trafficking Act
WWF Update: Wildlife
On October 7th, President Obama signed into law the END Wildlife Trafficking Act, following a unanimous passing in both houses of Congress. The legislation includes critical pieces of the Wildlife Trafficking Enforcement Act, which WWF supporters like you helped us advocate for in the Senate.
Why Vietnam Must Act Now to Save Rhinos
WWF Update: Wildlife
Nearly 1,400 rhinos were slaughtered for their horns across Africa last year—with most rhino horn smuggled into Vietnam. Yet, the government in Vietnam has done almost nothing. Vietnam is hosting the International Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade in November, and WWF officials will deliver a letter from our supporters calling for an end to the rhino horn trade. So far, more than 100,000 people have spoken up for rhinos. Watch now: why the Vietnamese government must act now to save rhinos.
Living Planet Report 2016
WWF Update: Wildlife
Of the declining terrestrial mammal populations in the Living Planet Index, 60 percent are threatened by overexploitation—including African elephant populations. The levels of illegally killed elephants have increased since 2005—peaking in 2011. Although there has been a slight decline since 2011, over half of the elephants found dead are still deemed to have been illegally killed. Poaching for ivory appears to be the primary cause of the decline in elephant numbers.

Current Actions

Take action now to save rhinos
Act Now to Save Rhinos

Vietnam must act urgently to shut down the rampant rhino horn trade. Help us show the Vietnamese government the world cares about rhinos. We’ll deliver your comments when they host the International Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade.

Take action now  ►
Take action now to protect Selous
Save Selous

By 2022 we could see the last of Selous’ elephants in Africa gunned down by heavily armed and well-trained criminal networks. Tell the Tanzanian government to strengthen its wildlife management and protect the Selous reserve.

Take action now  ►

Thanks for your continued commitment to this important work.

Sincerely,

Sara Thomas

Sara Thomas
Manager, Online Advocacy
World Wildlife Fund